The Tien Lu community nutrition club of 25 women in Vietnam meets four times a month to gain child nutrition knowledge and to practice cooking nutritious food for their children. 

Photo by Nguyen Kim Ngan/World Vision


Mum Rekha ensures her two sons benefit nutritionally from their organic vegetable garden planted in their home yard in Bangladesh. Prior to a training Rekha received about the benefits of nutritious food for her family, her sons often suffered from various health problems. After attending a porridge program she gained knowledge about child nutrition and learned techniques she uses today for preparing nutritious food from her garden.

Photo by Neuton Rony Das/World Vision


In the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan moms like Jana-Lyn find peace and comfort in World Vision's Women and Young Children Spaces where women come to relax, breastfeed, and talk with one another. Staff at the Spaces are trained in health and nutrition and teach the women who come about the nutritional value in breastfeeding. This kind of care and counseling means Jana-Lyn isn't worried about her son Arjhay's nutrition.

Photo by Joy Toose/World Vision


Mum Tsendsuren beams joyfully with her three children in Mongolia. Tsendsuren is dedicated to preparing nutritious food her children with the knowledge that nutrition is the most critical part of ensuring her children are healthy.

Photo by Togtokhbayar Dorjpalam/World Vision


Twenty-two year old university graduate in Myanmar Hkin Thandar is an advocate for maternal and child health and child nutrition in her community in Myanmar. She encourages people to practice good hygiene behavior by leading community behavior change health discussions five days a week. Before, mothers in her village did not know the importance of breastfeeding. Hkin's discussions are raising awareness in her community that is very effective.

Photo by Khaing Min Htoo/World Vision


The community women of Nilphamary district in Bangladesh are the reason their children are gaining weight and overcoming malnutrition. The women gather as part of health sessions where they learn to cook foods that are nutritious for their children.

Photo by Md. Golam Ehsanul Habib/World Vision


In Bangladesh, thirty-eight year old mother Lipi has learned the importance of child nutrition for her youngest child Shimanto (age 2). She says, "I could not take care of my child properly as I was not aware about child nutrition. I used to give him the same food as the other elder members of the family." Shimanto used to be severely underweight for his age, which caused him to have different health problems frequently throughout the year. After participating in a porridge program, Lipi learned the foods she should be feeding to her son to ensure his health improves.

Photo by Gloria Das/World Vision


This Self Help Group in India has helped women to save money, access bank loans to start their own businesses, and address the high rates of malnutrition in their community. While the women gather they prepare afternoon meals for over 60 children as part of a feeding programme that works to overturn malnutrition in their area.

Photo by Theodore Sam/World Vision


Doan Thi, mum of two daughters, is a proud member of a nutrition club in her community in Vietnam. Since joining the club and gaining knowledge about nutrition, Doan Thi always makes her childrens' porridge with nutritious ingredients.

Photo by Nguyen Kim Ngan/World Vision


Mother and Grandmother prepare a nutritious breakfast for the children in their family. Green vegetables, meat and eggs three times a day ensure their children are healthy as malnutrition in Cambodia is a big issue.

Photo by Vannedeth Um/World Vision


Mrs. Mai Thi feeds her eight-month-old son Quang a nutritional meal of rice, bean, and vegetable soup made of homegrown vegetables at their home in Vietnam. 

Photo by Le Thiem Xuan/World Vision